How much fitness does the body need at what age? A general vision

image: Shutterstock

Around Gsund

Even if the need to improve physically gets on my nerves a bit: it’s not so bad to stay in shape. However, when my almost 16-year-old son started lifting weights, I asked myself: is that healthy? What does our body actually do at what age? And what should you pay attention to when you train? I got smart.

sandra caslini

The body at 15 years

Until the early 20s, the body is in the growth phase, the bones are more elastic than in adults, which makes them more susceptible to injury. Muscles develop very rapidly during puberty, even without training, especially in boys, due to the increased release of testosterone. You are in the so-called “anabolic phase”. However, physical training also has advantages for young people: it is good for posture, strengthens bones and the musculoskeletal system, activates muscles, promotes coordination and stabilizes the cardiovascular system.

You should pay attention to that.

  • Prefers to train with lighter weights this reduces the risk of injury to the most vulnerable bones and muscles.
  • Sure, everyone wants triceps, biceps, and a six pack. But: If you train on one side, you run the risk of postural damage, So it includes all muscle groups.
  • Regeneration is particularly important in old age. Overtraining could lead to hormonal imbalances or inhibit growth. So take a day off after each training day.

The body at 25 years

In your mid-20s, the abundant growth hormone somatotropin ensures that muscle mass builds quickly and doesn’t break down as quickly, even if you don’t exercise. Not only the muscles, but also the bones and the cardiovascular system now react particularly to training impulses.

You should pay attention to that.

  • In your mid-20s, training is not only particularly easy, but also learning movement sequences. Anyone who from time to time replaces the gym with another sport not only has more fun, but also learns something for life.
  • The foundation for later physical fitness is now laid, not only in the body, but also in the mind! In other words, if you adopt a certain routine now, and don’t skip it every few days or throw it out of whack, it will be easier to stick to it in later years.

The body at 35 years

Already in the mid-30s, untrained muscles begin to break down, love handles settle in more easily than in previous years. Furthermore, at this stage of life, when it often feels like a thousand things are being handled at the same time, one is particularly susceptible to stress. This throws your metabolism out of sync and promotes fat storage. In addition, it increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

You should pay attention to that now.

  • At this stage of life, sport must have a purpose above all else: stress reduction. So if you’re also stressing yourself out by running to the gym three times a week to stay as Instagrammable as possible, you’re not doing your body or mind any good.
  • Not only endurance, but also muscle training can be top notch. integrate into everyday life Anyone who goes shopping on foot every other day and then carries the baby and shopping bag up the stairs has already done their job.

The body at 45 years

Sad but true: Starting in your mid-40s, your metabolism is already quite slow. For example, a 50-year-old woman of the same weight has twice as much adipose tissue as a 30-year-old woman (OMG, did she really want to know that now?). Muscle loss and hormonal changes not only cause weight gain, but also cause the body to lose stability, which can lead to joint pain.

You should pay attention to that.

  • In your mid-40s, you should focus more on building muscle and preventing muscle loss rather than endurance (which, of course, doesn’t mean you should neglect them entirely). Now the weights can be a bit higher to challenge the body. In addition, strength training gives a strong boost to the bones, which prevents osteoporosis.
  • Training the back, abdomen and core are especially important now to give the body more stability and prevent pain. You can also do it with yoga or pilates. AND: Keep your composure, especially at your desk!

The body at 55 years

Fat deposits are distributed differently and settle more and more often in the stomach. In addition, cells that break down bone are activated by hormone deficiency and bone mass recedes. Sports with sudden stopping movements, such as tennis or handball, can be problematic for the untrained.

You should pay attention to that.

  • Now is the time to give impulses to the muscles, bones and tendons. The best way to do this is with a combination of strength and resistance training. The latter also helps prevent insulin resistance, thus curbing the increasing risk of diabetes.
  • Attention: the body now needs more time to recover. Be sure to listen to it, take long enough breaks, and stop training if you are in pain.

The body at 65 years

Around age 60, muscles regress twice as fast as before. However, they continue to respond to training stimuli, and Anyone who has gained a good level of basic fitness in recent years now benefits from it. (According to a PACE study of marathon participants, a quarter of 65-69 year olds were faster than half of 20-54 year olds!) Y: Fitness is now also important for the mind. Studies have shown that people who are physically active are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

You should pay attention to that.

  • Too much ambition is harmful: Those who accept that the body is less efficient and adapt to it minimize the risk of injury.
  • Important in old age: Practice balance to avoid falls. It doesn’t have to be with the grandkids on the tightrope; for example, standing on one leg while brushing your teeth is sufficient.

How is your physical form? What experiences do you have at what age, what do you pay attention to and what advice do you have? Share them with us in the comment columns.

photo: Lucia Hunziker

About the Author:

sandra caslini she writes about more or less everyone and everything that crosses her path, always ruthlessly honest and with plenty of self-mockery. That’s exactly how she goes about the blog. “Around Gsund” which will appear every two weeks in Watson from now on. When it comes to health, Sandra is the same as raising children: she is not an expert, but she somehow gets along with both. Sometimes with her help, sometimes without her.

Casalini’s texts regularly appear in the parenting magazine “Fritz und Fränzi” and in “Schweizer Illustrierte”. At SI, he also provides weekly insights into his life with pubertal boys on the blog “Der quite normal Wahnsinn.”

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How healthy or unhealthy is your food? All relative.

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How healthy or unhealthy is your food? All relative.

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This 64 year old granny pumps everyone under the table, including you.

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Even if the need to improve physically gets on my nerves a bit: it’s not so bad to stay in shape. However, when my almost 16-year-old son started lifting weights, I asked myself: is that healthy? What does our body actually do at what age? And what should you pay attention to when you train? I got smart.

Until the early 20s, the body is in the growth phase, the bones are more elastic than in adults, which makes them more susceptible to injury. Muscles develop very rapidly during puberty, even without training, especially in boys, due to the increased release of testosterone. You are in the so-called “anabolic phase”. However, physical training also has advantages for young people: it is good for posture, strengthens bones and the musculoskeletal system, activates muscles, promotes coordination and stabilizes the cardiovascular system.

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